Tag Archive for sci-fi

Transhumanism and Falling Stars

This post is basically the result of some #CommuteThoughts.  It’s like Shower Thoughts, but it happens in the car when you’re not thinking of things like what to have for supper, or why the idiot in front of you can’t drive.

Recently I finished watching through the end of Season 4 of Babylon 5, and I was always fond of “Deconstruction of Falling Stars” – the season ending.  It would have made a decent series ending as well, if it had come to it(though I know they did already film “Sleeping in Light” in case it had been needed).

First, the ending scene with the sun going nova was supposedly only one million years later.  For that to happen that fast, something serious had to happen, and there was undoubtedly some sort of story there, even if it was never told.

Second, I like the fact that the guy who’s watching all the clips enters a very Vorlon-like encounter suit, but this one has a human shape despite some minor Vorlon stylings.  Given that fact, it makes you wonder if the Vorlon actually used to look like their suit before they went all energy-like-being on the universe.

Still, it brings up a point – not jsut in B5, but in most sci-fi, the more advanced races tend to turn into beings that appear to be pure energy, however little sense it makes.  It’s often framed in the device of evolution, of moving to a greater purpose.

Evolution is not that however – it is simply adaptations to new environments, and so on.  Turning into energy isn’t exactly a mutation that would happen in nature on its ownIt could make some kind of sense as an adaptation to space, but even then, stepping across that boundary and somehow allowing pure energy to exist as a cohesive organized whole is not something we see regularly in nature.

There is undeniably a spiritual underlaying to it as well.  The idea of the soul made manifest, leaving the flesh behind and expressing itself in its purest form.  These races are so advanced they do not need flesh to exist, and are able to manifest as pure soul. It is one way to look at it.

Another way however, if one were to take that destination shown in B5 as fact, is that it’s an expression of transhumanism, just taking a lot longer than some folks would wish.  Rather than some blind evolution or transformation imposed by nature and mutations, it’s a conscious choice made by a sapient species, leaving behind the restrictions of flesh to interact directly with existence.  No more need for hunger, sleep, or other biological functions(though some might still experience them as a matter of choice – after all, he did look like a normal human until we went to enter the suit).

The explosion of people questioning and challenging their own identity shows we are already starting to turn that direction – questioning what is human, and choosing our forms as much as we can, rather than letting them choose us.  A lot of folk do not understand this and deride it, or take it to extremes to strawman it.  There’s an element of humanity’s tribal tendencies as well, the “us vs them” and the driving out of those who do not fit the mold.

One example I came across recently was someone afraid that the new Star Trek series was going to be an over-the-top agenda-pushing show(ignoring the fact that Star Trek ahs always been about morality plays and “liberal” ideas since the beginning).  His example was that Picard would have come out as this multi-feathered tri-sexed impossible creature and all the “tumblrinas” would congratulate him on it.

Looking at it, I already see two concepts here that seem to be what really is pissing the guy off, or at least what he doesn’t understand(or even try to) and thus fears and mocks.

First, there’s an unspoken implication given the reference to “tumblrinas” that this is a way of saying “I’m better than you.”  Because he is not accepting the identity he was born with and selecting(either consciously, unconsciously, or spiritually) a more fitting self, and then parading it around, the troll, for lack of a better word, feels inferior because he is still the same, plain ordinary human, as much as anyone made of starstuff can be.

To be fair, there is a segment of folks out there who do view that their differing identity makes them superior to the common man.  THIS IS FALSE. A dragonkin’s life is as valuable as the family in Kentucky living out of a rusty RV and making a living skinning deer while cursing “dem immigrants” as evil.  It’s all life, and it is not what you are that makes you great, but how you live and treat your common sapients.  That does not mean that if they threaten to kill you you shouldn’t fight back, or that you have to tolerate their ideology, but it is the ideology that makes the difference, not the fact that one sees their true self as having scales and the other doesn’t see beyond the inside of the next beer can.

Which brings us to the second point I’ve seen personally, and by that I mean in-person: not understanding the questioning of self.

There is a person I know in meatspace that does not understand the point of transexuals. He’s fairly conservative, and has kids, so he’s particularly sensitive to the false depictions of perversion that certain parts of the media will revel in. He’s a great guy, but doesn’t seem to understand how one can question their identity.

To get more specific, I happen to sit outside his office so I overhear conversations all the time, and one that struck me was him and one of our more liberal-minded staff talking about the whole bathroom issue.  From there, it somehow came across the idea of white people considering themselves black, and that being equally as valid.  While I don’t remember the details, the impression I came away with is that he was very much seeing it as “what you are is what the world made you” and inability to accept that just did not make sense to him at all.

I think that’s the second route to these sorts of misunderstandings – the people in question do not grasp how identity can be a choice.  They think that when you draw your hand in life, it is wrong to call a mulligan and redraw.  In the previous skin-related example, maybe the theoretical skin-changer just feels more attractive that way, or is much more comfortable in the culture associated with that image – much as the way furry identity will tend to drift towards the animal that symbolically resonates with you the best.

(Side note: I have not brought up transhumanism with this guy yet, but plan to at some point, just to see how he responds to that idea.)

Now, that all said, to bring it back around I wouldn’t see Star Trek pulling that kind of thing.  First, Picard the character seems rather satisfied with the identity of what he is.  With holodeck technology and especially post-Voyager(for holoemitters) anyone would be able to more directly become anything they wish, at least part of the time.  Also, in Star Trek most of these sorts of things are not flaunted, but just accepted as they are.  A character does not come out as gay as some big event, they just happen to like men and approach them just as easily as a straight man might ask out a woman on a date. (which, for some, isn’t very easy!)

It all comes back to an inability to understand that leads to fear, and feelings of inferiority, due to the same or to some bad eggs that do try to cast others as inferior for not questioning themselves.

 

On one other note, coming back to the original topic of Babylon 5, what really is the point of organic technology?  The few times we see it in the series, it’s cast as this almost mystical ubertech that seems like it is the solution to everything.  But what have we actually seen or heard it do that makes it superior in any way to normal tech?

The biggest advantages depicted seem to be growth, self-repair, and self-direction.  Everything else is just a symptom of the big “black box” hiding the inner workings by throwing their hands up and declaring it was because it’s so incredibly advanced it’s not understandable(which, to be fair, can be a valid point too).

Self-direction can be accomplished by a sufficiently advanced AI, which does not rely on anything organic, so I’m going to set it aside for now.

Growth and self-repair on the other hand are basically two sides of the same coin.  Rather than replacing a burnt out circuit board, the ship could simply regrow the connections much as we regrow a cut in our skin.  Feed it the right materials and it can grow from a tiny starting point into a massively complicated machine – after all, in a way we’re just biological machines!

You could accomplish the same results with self-replicating nanomachines.  Actually, in a  sense, that’s what the cells that make us up are.  Still, it does not require what we would think of as organic to reproduce the same ideas and results.  Somewhere out there could be beings of pure nanomachines, created by a now-dead race.  Life just like ours, but with tiny specialized artificial machines replacing the naturally-created specialized cells constructing our bodies.  And rather than exchanging DNA, they could combine programming code, do a diff-merge, and produce new life from the new codebase introduced into their nanomachines.

Unless by organic technology you mean technology that acts like life does, not technology that works from the same cells etc that we do.  Then maybe you could say they did have a point.

Then again, food labeling itself as organic suggests that other food is inorganic, and I don’t see pasta as being made out of rock!

Future Imperfect – Cyberpunk is Now

Cyberdragon

So wow, been a while.  I meant to write this almost 6 months ago, but things came up and stuff was done, and I got distracted by other things site-related that I was considering doing first to the point I kept pushing this off.

Anyways, this was the other subject I referenced previously.  Shadowrun, Cyberpunk 20202, Neuromancer, and so on all painted a picture of a world wrapped up in cybernetics and wires, where man had enhanced himself with computers.  Nations still exist, but are much less important to the common man than the corporations they serve.  A lot of people think it’s still in the future, or that it’s a future that will never happen, but if you tilt your head just slightly, it’s pretty plain that we’re there already in many ways, and damn close on others.

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Future Imperfect – Virtual Transhumanism

So I was talking with a co-worker during some downtime recently, and the speculation it led to was quite interesting I feel.  It started with discussing how we’re in the future already that was talked about back in the 80s and 90s, but we just don’t recognize it(which is a topic I plan to go into seperately), and ended up with some discussion on how things may look in the near future, if we take current trends and run them out to a possible logical conclusion.

To start off with, let’s take a look at Shadowrun – take away the magic and D&D aspects, and it’s fairly standard cyberpunk.  In the original version, the Matrix was this world in virtual reality – VR and you could look like anything you wanted there.  Think Second Life, but with a full body VR, usually via direct neural interface.

As we worked on that tech in the real world, pure VR fell more to the side, partly due to the challenges of such tech versus the demand for such.  Instead, what grew up was a compromise; augmented reality.  Products like Google Glass and the holodisplay that Microsoft has demonstrated mix the virtual right over top of the real.  There are even games using similar tech now, such as the upcoming Pokemon Go.

As the developers of the Shadowrun system and universe updated it, they had to work in modern developments that were not expected back when it was created, such as AR and wireless, that people today might take for granted or see as near-future, and they had to do it in a way that made sense in-universe.  Thus came the wireless Matrix being available anywhere, after a fashion, and overlaid on the real world via AR to interact with.

Well, jumping off that idea, with AR you can overlay images to change how something looks.  What this means, is that fashion may take a sudden dive to the left, as the clothes no longer matter.

For purposes of this thought experiment, let’s assume that computational power is not an issue – cloud computing, etc tied into your visor/glasses/monocle/implants.  In much the same way that the studio was able to replace Arnold or his double in the later Terminator movie with his younger self, in AR your device could edit out a person’s appearance and modify it in real-time. Want some expensive, fancy clothes, but without risk of damaging or soiling them?  Let AR overwrite them onto your body for anyone tied into the network who looks at you.

The fashion world would be rocked, but adapt, and clothes would lose most of their appearance aspects.  Instead of wearing something to look good, you’d wear(or not wear) what was comfortable and affordable.  Most instances of clothes would become drab and utilitarian, while to the everyday folks they would be surrounded by a cavalcade of color and whimsy, full of outfits that are not physically possible.  In warmer weather, to a person not tied into the AR network, it might even seem as if he or she had walked into a nudist colony!

The capability does not stop there, however.  If clothes can be overlaid, so can full appearances.  While flying may not be possible on a personal level, you might end up with a scene looking like a high-resolution realistic Second Life, as the only limits would be those set by the system.  Furries, otherkin, cosplayers, and many others would be drooling over such a capability to truly become their character, or their true self, depending on perspective.

There would have to be limits of course, as their physical bodies still exist, so likely there would be few taurs or other four-leggers running around, or tinies or macro beings for that matter. That aside, on one level this would appear to be a gateway to transhumanism – to become more than human.  Setting aside any social stigma such as exists now for furries and others of a kindred nature, you could be walking down a street and pass a wolf, a faerie, a sumo wrestler, just to enter McDonalds and be served by a tigress whose outfit barely covers her and a robot with visible gears and pistons. People could effectively be anything humanoid they wanted to be.

On the other hand, it’s all virtual.  Turn off the implant, take off the glasses, and you’ll find the boring, mundane, drab grey world still exists behind the glitzy facade, much like Las Vegas.  For some, that may be enough, and with less push behind it from the semi-human quarter, progress and research in that direction may slow or even halt entirely in some aspects.

With less need to take care of themselves physically, there may be increased health issues as well, though possibly less than some would think, as smell is not included in our little thought experiment.  Sound could be, however, providing voice-changers to all and sundry.

This idea however I could easily see being reachable in our lifetime, given the strides networking, parallel processing, and cloud computing has made in the past decade.  Safely gene-splicing to phsycially modify our bodies is much, much further away, I feel.  But with being able to gain the “perfect” body via AR, whatever your definition of perfect, may dis-incentivize  research into actually gaining that body, which may push the end result out even farther.  Then again, there’s no reason that VR couldn’t take off again, allowing people to move in VR and interact with people in the real world via AR, while in the comfort of their home, or maybe even in a computer if anyone manages to solve the problem of how to upload our minds and souls into our creations.

I guess overall I see it as a blind alley that we could easily head into. There may be a door that leads us to someplace unexpected, or we may end up having to turn around and start from zero once more.  Then again, the rumored singularity may happen and we just hop the alley wall into the unknown.

“You can’t always get what you want.
But if you try sometime…
You just might find…
That you get what you need~”

All we need is time, time, time…. time is all we need

So I’ve been trying to get this written for the past several days, but kept pushing it back since I didn’t have enough time with all the other things going on.  It seems to be something you can only ever have too little of or too much of; and once it’s spent, it’s gone.  All sales are final, no refunds or exchanges allowed.  As we only have a finite amount of time in this existence, that’s why we have to decide on what we actually want to spend it on.  Thus, the concept of opportunity cost and so on.

While I didn’t plan this to be my original topic, I actually think this might be worth further expounding on a bit, as it leads into what I was originally wanting to talk about.

Basically, opportunity cost is something people will tend to ignore quite a bit, especially in MMO games, and almost certainly in F2P/microtransaction-based ones.  Heck, I’ve done it myself in WoW.

The Auction House in WoW is a living example of this.  I used to play the auction house for a while, and I know when I crafted something and tried to sell it I usually compared it to the cost of the mats when pricing things.  If it went below the cost of the mats, I sold the mats instead.  There are enough people out there that do not do this however that sellers have complained for ages.

You see, for some people, they might spend 5 hours mining(this is all pre-WoD) and gather a bunch of stuff, craft it, then throw it up.  They get undercut, so they super-undercut to try and sell their stuff first, with the end result of the market for that item “crashing” to the point the major sellers either leave it alone, or buy up all the cheap items to reset the value and resell them.  The original seller though?  He didn’t care, because he considers all the materials he mined “free” since he didn’t spend gold on it, so any gold is profit.  What he neglects to account for is the 5 hours he spent gathering it, when he could have been doing something else like running dungeons or old raids.  heck, beyond a certain point he might have made more gold just doing that instead of mining and crafting.

Until recently, this was less obvious as gold in WoW did not have a (legal) fixed value in real money.  With the time tokens available now however, that gold can be quantified against the money you actually make working.

Now working is something we have to do whether we want to or not, at least in the US.  We give up some of our limited time in exchange for the resources to do all the other things we actually want to do.  Still, say you make $15/hour working a specific job.  That means you can quantify an hour of your time as $15, just for arguments sake.

Now a month of sub time for WoW is $15.  Last I heard, a sub token costs around 22k gold, so there’s a rough equivalency there.  So, if you were doing it purely for gold gain and had other things you would have preferred to do with that time, paying real money for X that was around 22k might be a better deal than trying to farm and craft it yourself.  Of course, this also doesn’t factor in that there’s other competition for your work money, and that there’s still a limited amount of time spent working, compared to time spent doing something else.  If you work your MMO gaming like a job though(and not enjoying it) and aren’t making the equivalent of your work salary?  Well, you’re just plain doing it wrong, by the numbers.

Note also that you can’t get the money back out of the game(unless you’re looking at Second Life) – once it’s sunk into the game, it’s gone, period, and you’re left with whatever you got back from it e.g. gear, enjoyment, etc.

Now WoW has added the follower mini-game in WoD, which allows for offline progression.  For example you might spend 5 minutes logging in and setting up missions, and then spend 5 minutes later that day collecting 500 gold(or more, depending on follower traits).  There usually tends ot be little bits of dead time here and there in people’s schedules(such as eating breakfast before work) so you can take advantage of things like this without much of an opportunity cost.

Now WoW is sub-based, in that you need to pay every so often to keep access to the game, so if you’re not having fun, most folks would cancel their subscription or just stop playing. F2P games on the other hand don’t have that barrier.

Instead they have Microtransactions.  Little things here and there that can add up to the cost of a sub or (much!) more. Say there’s a “Gotta-have” item in the cash store.  Someone might look at it and go “$10?  Pff, this is a free game, I’m not paying that!” and then spend 10 hours grinding some currency to use instead for the same thing.  Without that initial barrier, many people won’t even look at how long something might take, but instead just grind it in an effort to keep it “free” while spending way too much time on it.  On top of that, some games(especially Korean-originated ones) turn that grind up to 11 to try to entice these people into paying instead without (quite) driving them off.

In other words, take a good long look at how long it might take you to get something in-game, and if you really want it, before trying to grind it out when playing F2Ps.  It might be a much better use of your limited time, if you can afford it, to reward the developers with a bit of cash, as long as you don’t go overboard and turn into a whale throwing their entire bank account at a game that could potentially disappear within a few years.

That said, it brings me back to the more personal part of what I was wanting to talk about, Star Trek Online.  F2P, and I started playing it a bit a month or two ago during some WoW downtime, as I believe I mentioned before.  Well I’m enjoying it enough and WoW little enough that my limited non-work time has gotten totally flipped around!

Before, I was spending most of my idle time in WoW trying to find things to do and doing my few-times-per-day/week “chores” for more resources.  A few weeks ago now I actually totally stopped logging into WoW except for raid nights, and the last couple I’ve actually not even done that – I just logged into the battle.net client to see if they needed me to fill out the 20 spots.

It’s kinda funny.  Raiding with Prestige was fun, but as we got deeper into Mythic, the pressure and stress just kept building to keep performing at peak constantly.  It was still a good rush to get a new boss down ahead of everyone, and even bigger to get a Server First on a Mythic end boss, but the push and pressure to try and get it down ahead of everyone were making me start to dread raid nights.  I could see that performance-wise, while I was never top material, I was getting towards the bottom compared to the excellent players already on the raid team.  While I’m fairly sure we’d still get them down with me there, there was an impression, whether mine or among certain people, that I might be holding them back from staying on top.

My mindset in raiding has always been to push progression, but at the same time to focus on our own and ignore what everyone else’s progression is.  Compete only with ourselves.  While when I started running with them that may or may not have been the main mindset, with how long we stayed on top of the listings it seems to have taken over in large part, especially among leadership.  That’s not what I’m playing for(though it is an ego boost) and I just plain wasn’t having fun with it anymore. Still, I was showing up because I knew we were short on players and I had implicitly agreed to be there.  Recruiting has been working out better recently however, which has allowed me to start stepping away from the game finally, especially since I have other things I can do now(like STO).

The main downside has been getting people I know to play!  With WoW, there’s multiple people there I know, but STO was a blank slate in that regard.  A large part of the game there for me is the story missions which are easily single player, but when I went in to try and pug for the first time I found myself missing having guildmates or othersuch on vent to coordinate with and learn all these instances.  I was able to stick with the easiest one since I was just farming it for marks, but eventually I’ll want to see the others.

At least there’s maybe 3 people I know RL I’ve gotten to give it a look, so if they like it and stick around that would be a start.

Either way, with STO it’s all still fairly fresh, and I’m mostly enjoying even the grinds still.  When it started to feel a bit annoying to do one(such as when I was grinding Tholian marks on Nukara) it’s easy enough to just hop over to do something else for a bit.  Since it’s almost all time-gated, once you get a certain amount of buffer you can just keep it to a minimum, or grind it out in one big go(like I mostly did with Nukara).

To bring my earlier points into this though, STO actually has a very leniant implementation of F2P.  Paying for just a race unlock(for cosmetic reasons – busty feline captain ahoy!) and using just the free stuff I was able to hit level cap and play though most of the content.  I could have kept on going, but I’ve taken a “time-out” from following the story to beef up my main’s ship and gear.

Needing pay content and wanting pay content, however, are two very different things, as shown by my race unlock.  Looking around, it’s easy to see how you can spend a lot of money in that game, even if none of it is required.  Cosmetic options, “gambling” for gear via the lockbox-key system, and the highest end ships are all behind the paywall, as well as unlocking additional slots for inventory, bridge officers, followers, and so on.  Skill respecs are even nominally behind it.

At first glance, it looks like a lot.  However, there’s a time-gated in-game currency that’s tradeable for the cash shop currency in much the same way as WoW’s time tokens – one person buys the cash shop currency, then trades it for the time-limited currency to speed things up(since it’s tied to a lot).  Most of the prices are low enough that you can get what you want after a couple weeks of just playing normally.You see, this currency may be time-gated in how fast you get it, but you get it from doing almost anything in the game, and you can buffer it up!  Right now I have enough that if I did nothing but log in for 5 seconds to refine it, I wouldn’t have to do anything else for 2 weeks to use up my stockpile.  On top of that, the limit is per-character, so the more alts you play, the faster you can get the currency and the less time it takes – although to be fair, at that point it might turn into more grind than fun beyond a certain point.

Pretty much the only thing that takes a huge amount of time is new ships.  Given this is Star trek, the makers know that’s the high demand item, and it’s priced appropriately – $20-$30 for a high end ship.  Using the exchange I was talking about? 3-4 months with only a single character’s limit. Obviously that scales down with multiple alts, but as I’m new and don’t have the “alt support structure” I have on WoW, that’s outside the scope of what I was looking at for myself.

They also have regular sales of 15-20% off, which helps as well.  So this past weekend I took advantage of that to dump around $60 into the game, since my “entertainment” budget for this month had barely been scratched.  In fact, the only other expense on it was paying for one month sub for STO, as it unlocks a LOT more stuff that you normally have to pay a lot more for separately. Even better, you get to keep almost all of it when you go back F2P, and if I resub later, the character-based benefits will also apply retroactively.

Basically STO, while it may have its own issues with power creep and has a lot of monetization, is also extremely fair to the casual player and nowhere near “pay-to-win” in my books.  I chose to give them some cash, as I was enjoying the game and helps make sure the game continues – and I shouldn’t need to spend any more in the near future as I get more established and better able to take advantage of things like the cash shop exchange.

As to what I’m going to be using the money I put in for?  I’ve got my eye on a couple ships, and last year around this time they had a 15-20% off ship sale…

It’s Spaaaaaaaace Tiiiiiiiiime!

No, I’m not rewatching Kamen Rider Fourze.  I just noticed it’s been a while since I wrote anything and at the moment I’m in a space-y mood.  And no, I don’t mean lightheaded.

I was just looking through an image thread about Star Trek ships, and it’s making me want to do something with them again.  Specifically, someone had dome up a modification of the “Miranda-class” and I’m really liking the design.  It does look a lot like a Romulan War Eagle or King Eagle cruiser though, which may be part of why.

Artemis and Peregrine

Peregrine-class , on the right.

Going back and thinking over the various designs I’ve liked though, I’ve realized I tend to be drawn to the small to mid size ships, similar to how I tend towards those type cars in real life too.   Light Cruisers, Medium Cruisers, Destroyers, those are all classes I’ve tended towards if I had a choice.

Looking back towards Star Fleet Battles/Command, I really liked the Kzinti ships. I didn’t start reading the Honorverse books until later, but I did like their Drone-heavy ships, especially in SFC2 when they introduced teh X-tech from SFB(with a twist) to SFC and I got MIRV-drones.  Running a drone-variant ship really feels like the Star Trek equivalent of a Honorverse ship.  Only downside is the closest thing to Missle pods is the Scatter Pack, which you can’t produce in bulk ahead of time.  Also, control channels becomes an issue then, as Kzinti ships don’t have near the drone control capability of an Honorverse ship.

The MDC Foxfire - my ship during SFC online play

The MDC Foxfire – my ship during SFC online play

Romulans are another race I’ve always liked, mostly for the cloaking device.  It lends a sort of “submarine” feel.  I’ve never cared for their Klingon refits, but the King Eagle is one design I’m sort of fond of.  In part, I’ve always envisioned the first-generation ships as showing the Romulan’s actual design sensibilities, in addition to being specifically designed to work with cloaking.  Did I mention they also have equal strength shields all around?

I feel that the 3rd gen on the other hand borrow too much from Klingon aesthetics on principle, though a few of them look just fine as-is.  I do have to admit, I did see a image recently of a render of a 3rd generation ship that, with the right colors, reminded me a lot of the Next Gen Romulan ships.  It looks a lot nicer than the regular Sparrowhawk light cruiser in the plain grey colors.

Fasthawk (Firehawk variant)

Fasthawk (Firehawk variant)

Then again, those colors and the Romulan Logo are very reminiscent of the Clan Jade Falcon, from Battletech, which happens to be one of my favorite Battletech factions!  And there was one image of a Sparrowhawk redesign I did like in the original scheme.

Sparrowhawk (redesign) beauty shot

Sparrowhawk (redesign) beauty shot

I’ve toyed with most of the other factions at one time or another, but the only other race I really felt a draw to the ship design of was the Lyrans.  yes, another feline race, but something about the catamaran and Trimaran hull just grabs my attention, especially on the Destroyer/War Cruiser hull.  I’m not drawn to Disruptors, and the ESG can be tricky to use well, but they are some rather sharp ships.

SFC style Lyran CW

SFC style Lyran CW

Another thing this space kick I’m on gave me an idea for is the best ever costume for a dragon for Halloween: the Enterprise!  If I can get it done before Halloween, I’m going to try and get a sketch commission of myself wearing that as a costume.

But now I really want to play something with these ships!